Meet the Author: Marilyn Johnson, author of THIS BOOK IS OVERDUE and LIVES IN RUINS - Google+

Find out about what Marilyn’s next book is about — even if it can’t possibly be as interesting as one about librarians ;)

Our Online Programs in One Place…

So you can easily add them to your calendars.

Today, 7pm Eastern: John Searles, author of Help for the Haunted
we’re using Hangouts on Air — join us at the event page, where you can watch and submit questions

Monday, July 21 at 4pm Eastern: Marilyn Johnson, author of This Book is Overdue! and Lives in Ruins
we’re using Hangouts on Air — join us at the event page, where you can watch and submit questions

Monday, August 11 at 8pm Eastern: Betsy Bird (NYPL, Fuse8) interviews Mara Rockliff and Eliza Wheeler, author and illustrator of The Grudge Keeper
we’re using GoToMeeting — visit our Tumblr post for more info, and join us by using the meeting access code: 182-359-194

Friday, August 22 at 2pm Eastern: Ann Hood, author of The Knitting Circle and An Italian Wife
we’re using Hangouts on Air — join us at the event page, where you can watch and submit questions

Stay tuned — we may add more as the summer progresses! You can also read more about why we are doing this and past programs in the series, featuring a livestreamed event, a Facebook chat, and an online book club.

Join BiblioCommons and nypl and schoollibraryjournal's Betsy Bird (@FuseEight on Twitter) on Monday, August 11 at 8pm EDT for the next in our series of online programs, as Betsy leads a discussion with author Mara Rockliff (left) and illustrator Eliza Wheeler (right) on their picture book The Grudge Keeper (Peachtree).

Intended for adults, this program will highlight the collaborative process between the author and the illustrator through their own stories, notes, and sketches, as well as sharing how we adults can truly appreciate the picture book medium.

This program is part of our ongoing series to highlight how libraries can take advantage of common tools, including BiblioCommons, to serve their online reading community. For this program, we’ll be using a product many of us are quite familiar with: GoToMeeting! With its easy ability to share screens, highlight visual content, have multiple speakers, and mute the audience until Q&A time, GoToMeeting is a great resource for this kind of program.

All you need to attend is the following information:

1.  Please join my meeting, Aug 11, 2014 at 8:00 PM PDT.
2.  Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone.
United States: +1 (646) 749-3117
Access Code: 182-359-194
Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting
Meeting ID: 182-359-194

libraryjournal:

Librarian mohawks – makes you do a double take, right? Those are two words that usually do NOT go together.

But thanks to Vista, now they do, as five good-natured librarians made good on their promise this spring and got mohawks because the community pushed them to a big milestone – Vista was the first county library to make it over the 1-million check-out mark.

That means the community checked out more than 1 million books, DVD’s and CDs over the course of the fiscal year, which ended June 30.

Do you dare to take the librarian mohawk challenge?

Meet the Author: Cocktail Hour with John Searles - Google+

You have this on your calendar for Thursday, right?

Join us on July 21 at 4pm Eastern for a chat with Marilyn Johnson, every librarian’s favorite chronicler of librarianship (see This Book is Overdue!)  We’ll have a Google Hangout with Marilyn and BiblioCommons’ Stephanie; bring your questions for Marilyn, and, well, hang out.

Marilyn may be best known to librarians for This Book is Overdue!, but she spent time previously working as an obituary writer (see samples on her website), and published a book on obituary writing and writers, The Dead Beat. Her new book, Lives in Ruins: Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble (HarperCollins), is due out in November.

Before July 21, earn your Marilyn Johnson author fan badge, and then earn a badge for taking part in the online discussion.

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This online program is part of our series designed to celebrate author fan badges. We’ve arranged with several publishers to have their authors take part in online programming opportunities, which we hope our libraries, and their patrons, will take advantage of. Feel free to add them to your summer programming lists — this one is perfect for staff and patrons who would like to experiment with online book clubs.

Between the user generated content in BiblioCommons catalogs, author fan badges, and online programs, libraries can really celebrate their online reading communities this summer. In addition to digital badges for interacting with the catalog, attending programs, completing challenges, visiting libraries, taking part in summer learning opportunities, and more, libraries will have the ability to highlight their online reading communities through digital fan badges. Imagine if, when in your library catalog, you as a reader are prompted to become a fan of a favorite author — say, Rainbow Rowell — and then, by declaring yourself a fan, you have the ability to see who else in your community is a fan and interact more deeply with Rainbow’s books and your fellow fans? Pretty cool, right?

2014 Evergreen Award Nominees - Aurora Public Library

An excellent way to add some Canadian authors to your TBR pile.

Experimenting with Online Programming

As part of our work this summer with digital badging, we’re looking at how badges can draw together online communities — in particular, around favorite authors. This is the drive behind our author fan badges project.

In support of that project, we are also experimenting with providing programming to online communities. For libraries, in particular, the technological hurdles to providing an online program can seem significant, and we hope to help libraries realize it can be simple and easy to provide an online component to an in-person program, or to offer online-only programs.

We’ve worked with publishers to provide a wide variety of different kinds of programs. We hope you will be excited about the authors we have, but also take advantage of trying out the different kinds of programs.

Facebook chats are probably the least time consuming online program. The nature of the program makes it asynchronous, so it is easy for both the organizer and participant to dip in and out of the discussion. Decide what time you would like to have your author available to participate, and then start the discussion with a post on your Facebook page at that time. Ask for the discussion to occur in the comments. You can have the organizer, the author, and all of the participants be located anywhere, and only the organizer needs to have admin privileges for the Facebook page you are using. If the author does not have a Facebook presence they can or want to reply through, the organizer can post the author’s replies.

We hosted a Facebook Chat with Edward Jay Epstein, author of The Annals of Unsolved Crimes, on June 11, in partnership with melvillehouse. You can see the discussion on their Facebook page and a summary on their blog.

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Next in the list might be Twitter chats, which operate under the same theory but require more organizational oversight, as you follow the chat by hashtag, and the comments may not necessarily be in order. As with Facebook chats, the organizer, author, and participants can be anywhere!

Why not move your book discussions online? You could use Facebook or Twitter to do so, or something more formal, with a moderator. We suggested Macmillan’s the Chief Inspector Gamache Re-Read as a great example.

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Google Hangouts are an easy way to connect an author and multiple audiences — though, be forewarned, you may need to spend a significant amount of time making sure your organization has a Google+ page that is connected to your YouTube channel, and that you have the appropriate people as managers of the page, able to set up the Hangout.

We recommend using Hangouts on Air. Like a regular hangout, up to 10 people can join — but unlike a regular Hangout, you can schedule the event and share the link, and you have people watching (but not participating) in the program. That means you, the library, can have the ability to talk to the author (so, two people in your Hangout), and an unlimited number of people watching — or, you could have the library, the author, and 8 people from your bookclub or 8 winners from your Summer Reading Program or whatnot in the Hangout and an unlimited number of people watching. The 10 participants can be in 10 different places. For more information, see the Hangouts on Air FAQ.

We have several Hangouts scheduled, with the first being John Searles on July 17 at 7pm, followed by Marilyn Johnson on July 21 and Ann Hood in August.

Livestreaming may be the most complex kind of online programming, because many libraries do not have the technology to offer high quality streaming video. That being said, many publishers are offering streaming programs for their authors, which libraries could simply add in to their programming schedules, and either display in their meeting rooms, ask patrons to participate in from their computers, or both. Some of our larger libraries, notably nypl, livestream programs.

We shared the livestream of the keynote and Q&A from randomhouse's Outlander Fan Retreat with Diana Gabaldon on June 7.

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Providing deeper interactions for patrons: in addition to hosting the online programs, think about ways to reach out to patrons and offer something special. Maybe patrons patrons who meet certain criteria (they have a fan badge!) can email questions ahead of time, or be part of the small number who can interact with the author in the Google Hangout. Offer patrons who attend the ability to obtain a digital badge, through a badge code, for being part of the program.

What about author visits via Skype? Skype allows one-to-one video conferencing, so the author can call in to your library, and your library can set up a computer, projector, speakers, and a microphone. Skype chats can feel really warm and intimate, as often you might be talking with the author in their own home. It can be difficult to use Skype for a purely online program because of the limitations of how many people can call in — hence the use of Google Hangouts. A Hangout can give the same experience, but with the ability to have more participants.

Online programming can take many forms — and with John Searles (HarperCollins), we’re going to focus on fun. 

Join us on July 17 at 7pm Eastern for cocktail hour with Johnauthor of Help for the Hauntedfresh out in paperback. We’ll have a Google Hangout with John and BiblioCommons’ Stephanie; bring your cocktails and your questions, and, well, hang out.

Before July 17, earn your John Searles author fan badge, and then earn a badge for taking part in the online discussion.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

This online program is part of our series designed to celebrate author fan badges. We’ve arranged with several publishers to have their authors take part in online programming opportunities, which we hope our libraries, and their patrons, will take advantage of. Feel free to add them to your summer programming lists — this one is perfect for staff and patrons who would like to experiment with online book clubs.

Between the user generated content in BiblioCommons catalogs, author fan badges, and online programs, libraries can really celebrate their online reading communities this summer. In addition to digital badges for interacting with the catalog, attending programs, completing challenges, visiting libraries, taking part in summer learning opportunities, and more, libraries will have the ability to highlight their online reading communities through digital fan badges. Imagine if, when in your library catalog, you as a reader are prompted to become a fan of a favorite author — say, Rainbow Rowell — and then, by declaring yourself a fan, you have the ability to see who else in your community is a fan and interact more deeply with Rainbow’s books and your fellow fans? Pretty cool, right?